Posts tagged "film"

Chris Evans might have built his career on comic book movies — both Fantastic Four movies, The Losers, Captain America: The First Avenger, and the soon-to-be blockbuster The Avengers — but Evans is more than just muscles. 

In fact, unlike many actors who decide at very early age that acting is all they ever want to do, Evans tells Prestige magazine that he juggled two activities in school that eventually prepared him for his physical roles.

Evans admits he was the classic extracurricular overachiever in school since he juggled sports and theatre.  He explains, “My older sister started doing the plays maybe in seventh, eighth grade. She looked like she was having a ball; they would give her candy after the performances and she was hanging out with all these kids, going to all these little parties. And I was just like…this looks like fun. This is just like playing a sport after school – she’s got events and performances. It looked like she was having such a good time. So I gave it a shot when I was in sixth grade and just loved it. I loved the process of performing, the excitement of shows, and it just stuck in throughout the years. I would kind of just split my time between sports and acting.”

Despite his background in sports, Evans doesn’t pretend that he does all his own stunts, but he does feel comfortable with the physical aspect of his superhero roles.  He points out, “There’s some stuff they just won’t let you do, it’s too risky. But for the most part I always feel better putting the gloves on and just getting in the ring. If you want to have some control over the performance – no matter how subtle it may be within the context of a stunt – it’s still something you want to have a say in. So I always try and do it myself.  It does take a good degree of coordination even just to throw a punch because it has to look like something natural.”

He also confesses that because of his family life he was naturally inclined to acting.  He says, “I come from a very theatrical family, just in the way we are and the way we speak. We’re very dramatic, very over-the-top. So being on stage and being comfortable and making a fool of yourself – it felt natural. And I loved films. I was huge into movies growing up; still am. I absolutely love them. And so the more I did theatre the more I drew parallels between theatre and film and tried to incorporate more film acting on stage as I got older. And then realised this well – of potential and what you can do with acting – goes pretty deep, and I just started to explore it more.”

Despite his recent success, Evans explains that because of all the elements that go into a movie and all the people involved he is shocked when one of his becomes a blockbuster.  He admits, “I’m surprised by any movie that is successful. At this point I’ve made a lot of films. I’ve made about 20 movies and I’m probably proud of three. It’s not easy making a good movie. All these people coming together.  All these individual creative minds trying to cook one dish. It’s hard to make it taste right, you know. So any time you have a quality film, it’s a blessing. If it was easy to do, there would be a lot more of them. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve left the [movie] theatre disappointed.”

I think most movie fans are hoping that Evans isn’t disappointed with The Avengers, which opens May 4.

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by Emily Grace

All of these celebrities are doing it: Pitt, Clooney and Damon. Kristen Wiig, Tina Fey, Maya Rudolph and Amy Poehler. The Coen Brothers. Judd Apatow.

Why aren’t you?

What are they doing, you ask?  Working with the same people again and again.

In business it’s what is called the Know-Like-Trust Factor.  And it’s the secret sauce to going from auditions to offers.

World renowned speaker and best selling author Zig Ziglar says,

"If people like you, they will talk to you. If people trust you, they will do business with you."

Professionals at every level of the entertainment industry, when given the choice, will hire someone they know, like and trust - from a-lister’s all the way down to a first time student filmmaker.

When it comes to your acting career - it’s time to stop chasing after random audition opportunities just for the sake of getting into the room.   Create long-term relationships to establish the know-like-trust factor, and you’re well on your way to being hired over and over.

The know-like-trust principle is simple to understand.  The more people know, like and trust you, the more likely they are to hire you when you’re a good fit for the project.  No rocket scientist required.

The biggest question actors tend to struggle with is where to find the people to connect with in the first place.  It’s actually a lot easier than you might think.

So let me walk you through how an internet connection and a little bit of detective work can get you started on the road from auditions to offers.

Get clear about the kind of work you want to be doing

"I just want to work."  You’ve said it.  I’ve said it.  We’ve all been there.  It’s a lot like saying "I just want a boyfriend."  Without some standards, you’ll end up with a real douche that makes you miserable.  Girlfriend (boyfriend?) you deserve way better!  Don’t be so desperate you’ll take any old acting job that comes along, no matter what.  Get yourself some standards!

What kind of work do you want?  Is it indie film?  Do you want to be paid?  How about an imdb credit?  If you’re looking to book tv credits - what kind of shows are best suited to your strengths?  Sitcom?  Single camera comedy?

Spend some time getting clear about the work you are most passionate about.  When you know what you want to be doing, it will lead you to the people who can hire you for it.

Just like the gps in your car - you need a destination before you get the map.  Know where you’re going in  your career in order to choose the best plan of action to get there. 

Do your research

Great, you’ve got a direction!  Now it’s time for some detective work.  Who hires for the kind of work you want to be doing? 

In the entertainment industry directors, producers and casting directors often refer to their “wheelhouse.”  Meaning they are attracted to certain kinds of projects.  Your job is to begin identifying specific people who’s taste, style, body of work, and projects are similar to your own “wheelhouse.” 

Great tools for this research include:

  • Film festival websites - what better place to research independent filmmakers, directors, producers and casting directors?
  • Casting about - this is a fabulous research tool for finding who is casting what in both New York and LA (that includes tv, film and theatre)
  • ImdbPro - The go-to database for pretty much anyone in the entertainment industry
  • Social media - you can directly connect with so many filmmakers, casting directors, and other industry pros, it is truly mind blowing
  • Google - never underestimate the power of a plain old google search

(Want to see exactly how easy it is to find filmmakers online?  Get this free video for step-by-step instructions)

Make a list of specific people you want to work with

Once you’ve done your research, you want to choose a handful of people to build long term relationships with.  Your best bet here is to choose people who are accessible to you.  Sure, working with Judd Apatow or George Clooney may be a viable goal for you, but neither of these guys are readily available to build a relationship with.  Focus on people who you can find current contact information for - that can be an active social media profile, an office address, or email.  

Keep this list small.  The bigger the list, the harder it will be to manage.  Start small.  You can always expand once you get the hang of it.

Connect with your people

The key here is when establishing a relationship, focus on how you can help the other person, not the other way around.    Shoving your headshot in someone’s face is going to be a turn off. 

Is the filmmaker you want work with doing a kickstarter campaign?  Help them spread the word.  Did a casting director contribute a great blog post?  Let them know how helpful it was to you and then retweet it.  The more you focus on being of genuine service to someone else, the better know-like-trust factor is established.

There are various ways to begin long term industry relationships with specific people.  Here are a few possibilities:

Film Festival Screenings

This is a powerful way to connect with specific filmmakers.  You know they are going to be there, and you can bet they will take kindly to someone who appreciates their work.  Plus that in-person connection is a big plus.

Social Media

Everyone is on social media, from celebrities to casting directors to filmmakers, producers and agents.  If the people on your list are on social media, connect with them there.

Can’t make it to the film festival to catch that screening?  I bet your filmmaker has a twitter account.  Connect with them there.  In fact, help them spread the word about their screening or trailer or kickstarter campaign.  What a great way to begin a relationship - by being of service to someone else, rather than asking what they can do for you. 

Workshops, events and panels

Is someone on your list giving a talk, having a class or sitting on a panel?  Go there!  Meet them!  Afterwards, tell them what you enjoyed about their presentation. 

Follow that in-person interaction up with a thank you card in the mail.  Check them out on social media and tweet about what a great talk they gave.

These are all great ways to begin that first connection.

Follow up consistently

Once you’ve started the initial relationship, you have to keep it going.  Communicate consistently with the people on your list to build the know-like-trust factor.

In addition to continuing to support your new industry relationships, be sure to keep them informed about what’s up in your career too.  Remember that a relationship develops over the long term.  Know-like-and-trust doesn’t happen over night.  It is a process.   Be persistent in your efforts.

Focus on the stuff that gets results

Many actors put their attention in the wrong place.  They hear about an audition, then they push-push-push trying to get seen for it.  If your first interaction with a casting director, filmmaker or producer is you trying to land an audition, you’re probably too late.  They are going to give auditions (and offers) to actors they already know, like and trust.  The likelihood of someone taking a risk on an unknown talent when they are on a tight deadline to cast an important role is very small, if it happens at all.

The more time you spend focusing on building strong industry relationships and upping your know-like-trust factor, the better off you will be.  When the people you want to work with know very well who you are and what you are capable of as an actor, soon enough you will be the actor getting called in, and in some cases getting a direct offer without having to audition at all!

Want to learn how to find filmmakers online?  This free video will show you the exact step by step, so you can get on the road from auditions to offers.  Hurry!  It’s only online until April 9th.

Emily Grace helps actors get in the driver’s seat of their career with marketing plans that get results.  She is an award-winning actress, a writer and producer.  Want to hear more from Emily?  Be sure to sign up for her weekly newsletter full of useful tools to navigate the entertainment industry at www.emilygrace.tv

Useful Links: How To Become An Actor, How To Make An Acting Resume, Acting Resume Template and Headshot Photographers

For Mad Men’s Vincent Kartheiser, being on television’s most celebrated drama means being able to step away from everyday life and seeing the world from a different perspective. Kartheiser, a real-life minimalist who has sold or given away most of his worldly possessions and is extremely concerned about the environment, plays a backstabbing young advertising executive on AMC’s period drama.

“Anytime we can do something that’s so different than ourselves, it gives you a head start into finding parts of yourself you can explore. That’s the fun part of my job — pretending to be someone I’m not,” Kartheiser recently told Advertising Age. “It’s nice to have things that kind of kick-start you away from yourself, because you’re used to making the choices you always make. At least I am.”

Considering his wealth of acting experience, Kartheiser has surely tapped into many sides of himself. The 33-year-old was doing dozens of commercials a year from a young age and has kept busy in recent years, appearing in seven films in the past two years. “One year I did 65 radio commercials! I made good money when I was a young man doing that sort of thing.”

No matter the role he’s playing, Kartheiser says he’s able to draw upon the human condition all the same. Perhaps that’s why he’s so believable as his polar opposite on Mad Men. “To tell you the truth, our show is about advertising, but it doesn’t matter whether your character is a copywriter or an artist or an agent,” he continued. “We’re human beings and the human experience is universal.”

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After their successful run of Lombardi, a play about the NFL’s most legendary coach, producers Fran Kirmser and Tony Ponturo decided to tackle two icons from another sport in their next play: basketball icons Larry Bird and Magic Johnson, who engaged in one of sport’s most talked-about rivalries during their playing careers. 

The relationship between the two men, both on-the-court and off-the-court, is the basis of the play Magic/Bird, starring Kevin Daniels as Johnson and Tug Coker as Bird.  Coker spoke to the Associate Press about what he brings to the role beyond his size.

For Coker, who grew up a Boston Celtics fan, playing Bird on stage is pretty close to his dream come true.  He says, “I never thought people would pay to come and see me play basketball.” 

He knew his stature and childhood love of the sport made him the perfect fit for the role.  He points out, “It’s not very often where you’re doing a film or a play where it’s like, ‘You actually want this skill? I have that. I can do this! You’re looking for me!’  So, for me, I was really excited to have the opportunity to tap back into something that I really grew up loving and really wanted to be.”

Though Coker and Daniels needed to be a physical match for the roles — both are 6’5” and have athletic builds — neither is a reject from a local basketball team trying to break into another career.  In fact, Coker was trained at the American Repertory Theater and Daniels went to The Juilliard School.  The 34 year-old Coker has previously appeared in over twenty television roles, including CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Raising Hope, How I Met Your Mother and The Office.  Daniels has also appeared on television shows like Modern Family, but has also had roles in films like Ladder49 and The Island.  However Broadway is new to both of them — Coker has never been on Broadway before, while Daniels has only appeared on Broadway in a short-run 1998 revival of Twelfth Night.

As a result, both men did extensive research into their roles.  For example, Coker talked with Bird on the phone and visited his hometown.  When curious residents of French Lick, Indiana wondered how Coker would portray Bird, he answered, “Just relax. We’ve got wigs and mustaches coming in.”

 Nonetheless, Coker realizes the challenge of a play based on a professional sport: there are both those familiar with the basketball Hall of Famers and others who know nothing of sports.  He explains, “The challenge for us I think is to give something new to people who know the story extremely intimately. And also entertain and educate and enlighten people who just come to see theater and don’t know sports.  So we’re walking a fine line.”

Magic/Bird is now running at the Longacre Theatre.

via Yahoo!

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looper-posterLooper looks really good. At WonderCon, they had a panel on the upcoming Rian Johnson flick and showed most of what you see here in the trailer below, with a few extra stuff, juicy stuff thrown in.

Synopsis: In the futuristic action thriller Looper, time travel will be invented - but it will be illegal and only available on the black market. When the mob wants to get rid of someone, they will send their target 30 years into the past, where a “looper” - a hired gun, like Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) - is waiting to mop up. Joe is getting rich and life is good… until the day the mob decides to “close the loop,” sending back Joe’s future self (Bruce Willis) for assassination. The film is written and directed by Rian Johnson and also stars Emily Blunt, Paul Dano, and Jeff Daniels.

Director: Rian Johnson
Cast: Bruce Willis, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Emily Blunt, Paul Dano, Noah Segan, Piper Perabo, Jeff Daniels

In Theaters: September 28th

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Written by Anthony Meindl

Everything on this planet is going to expire.

You will. Your friends. Your family. Things you possess. Things in your immediate environment. Everything has a shelf life.

We buy things and then let them expire because we keep waiting for the perfect time to use them. Or enjoy them. Or partake in them.

We’re waiting for the perfect moment. The magical moment. The right time.

The perfect moment is now. Because you’re alive here and now.

Stop postponing things for two weeks from now. Or when you get the bigger house. Or the hotter girlfriend. Or have more money in your account. Or have a bigger resume.

I looked through my refrigerator to see what items had long since expired. To my shock, I found some chocolate pudding from 2003.

Why do we wait to open that bottle of wine? Why do we wait to celebrate what we have and who we are right now?

Was I waiting to make a chocolate soufflé for some magical boyfriend who never appeared?

I could have been eating my own chocolate pudding!

Enjoying it. Celebrating it.

Stop postponing. Stop procrastinating. Stop letting things run past their expiration date.

DO THIS HOMEWORK:  Look through your pantry. For each thing you find in your kitchen or in your fridge whose expiration date has already passed – you must do one thing that you’ve been postponing for each item you find.

Important things you’ve been postponing. Like that talk with your boyfriend. Or that meeting with that agent. Or that phone call you’ve been putting off forever.

Expiration date. Today. No excuses.

Anthony Meindl is an award-winning writer, producer, director and actor whose first feature screenplay, THE WONDER GIRLS, was the Grand Prize Winning Feature Screenplay in the Slamdance Film Festival Screenplay Competition in 2007. Prior to this accomplishment, Meindl was responsible for the production of an array of award-winning projects. His background in acting, training, and performance has afforded him the opportunity to create what has become a thriving artist community in Los Angeles.

Check out Anthony’s book, At Left Brain, Right Turn

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On Tuesday, May 1st, Kristin Chenoweth and Jim Parsons will announce the nominations for the American Theatre Wing’s 66th Annual Tony Awards. 

You can watch the nominations live at 8:30am ET/5:30am PT on TonyAwards.com.  CBS will air a portion of the nominations that morning as well as the NYC cable TV channel, NY1.

Chenoweth and Parsons will reveal the recipients of nominations in each of the 26 competitive categories. Productions that opened during the 2011-2012 Broadway season on before the April 26 cut-off date may be eligible for Tony Awards this year.

Chenoweth, a past Tony-winner and two-time nominee who created the role of Glinda in Wicked, most recently appeared on Broadway in Promises, Promises. Parsons made his Broadway debut last season in The Normal Heart, and will star in Roundabout Theatre Company’s new Broadway production of Harvey at Studio 54 beginning May 18.

The Tony Awards, hosted by Neil Patrick Harris, will air on CBS on Sunday, June 10th.

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Eric-McCormack-The-Best-ManWill & Grace star Eric McCormack is currently starring in the Broadway revival of Gore Vidal‘s The Best Man with an all-star cast: James Earl Jones, John Larroquette, Candice Bergen, Kerry Butler, Jefferson Mays, Michael McKean and Angela Lansbury.  Speaking with New York Magazine, McCormack talks about the challenges of the role and how he confronts the audience’s expectations of him.

One thing that bothers McCormack is when he’s labeled a television actor, since the label is both inaccurate and seemingly puts him in a box.  He says, “I always get a little uppity when I hear the phrase ‘TV actor’… I was in the theater for ten years before I ever had a TV audition. It’s what I come from and what I do, and the thing with the sitcom is it was essentially theater: We did it in front of a live audience for eight years.”

Yet those who recognize McCormack from Will & Grace will likely be surprised by McCormack’s Southern accent in the play.  McCormack believes accents are more of a problem for audiences than for actors, pointing out, “Doing accents for most actors is not a problem — it’s the audience’s problem. If you’d never seen me before, you wouldn’t know what I sound like, but the problem is I was on television for a long time, so I think we’ll end up being judged.”

The interviewer points out that McCormack is forty-eight, but seems like he’s been playing mature adult roles his entire career.  He says, “I think it’s because when I was starting out there wasn’t Gossip Girl or Melrose Place — there wasn’t much use in being 18 or 20.  The good roles were all being played by guys who were 30, and that’s what I wanted to be. Very early on in theater school when I was auditioning for things, that’s the kind of energy I was taking out there. So I kinda was 30 before I was 30, and was 30 through my thirties and forties — and I’m still sorta playing late thirties? Which is great! It’ll change one day, but in the meantime, skin products are our friends.”

Now that McCormack’s on Broadway, he’s got a few more plans, including one of his dream roles, the lead in Sweeney Todd.  He reveals, “I actually pitched it to Megan Mullally, that when we both got into our fifties we could do Sweeney and Mrs. Lovett together.”

The Best Man runs through July 8 at the Schoenfeld Theatre.

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In a recent interview on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, actor Andrew Garfield revealed he doesn’t wear anything underneath his Spidey suit. 

The talk show host asked the star of The Amazing Spiderman, “Was there anything under that suit?  It’s so skin tight it seems you would see lines of underwear or something like that.  Is there anything under there?  Nothing under there?”  Garfield replied: “It’s just me.”

The conversation, reported by Yahoo! News, also included Garfield telling DeGeneres that the costume was extremely difficult to work in. 

He said, “It’s made of something that is designed to make you irritated.”  The 28 year-old said it was hard getting into shape to play the famous superhero.  He said, “It was a life change.  I get frustrated with those Men’s Health magazines, [saying] it’s like in five minutes you’ll be as fit as a fiddle if you just follow those three simple steps and only eat cucumbers.  This was hard work.  I wouldn’t be able to do it without someone [helping me.]”

Check out the video!

The film, also starring Emma Stone, Denis Leary and Campbell Scott, opens everywhere on July 3.

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take-this-waltzThis June, if you’re looking for an alternative to the summer bang ‘em up films, Sarah Polley's Take This Waltz, might just do the trick. 

Take This Waltz: When Margot (Michelle Williams), 28, meets Daniel (Luke Kirby), their chemistry is intense and immediate. But Margot suppresses her sudden attraction; she is happily married to Lou (Seth Rogen), a cookbook writer. When she learns that Daniel lives across the street from them, the certainty about her domestic life shatters. She and Daniel steal moments throughout the steaming Toronto summer, their eroticism heightened by their restraint. Swelteringly hot, bright and colorful like a bowl of fruit, TAKE THIS WALTZ leads us, laughing, through the familiar, but uncharted question of what long-term relationships do to love, sex, and our images of ourselves.

Written & Directed by: Sarah Polley
Starring: Michelle Williams, Seth Rogen, Sarah Silverman, Luke Kirby

In Theaters: June 29th

 
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Let It Cast is now accepting auditions for Director Paul Schrader's new film, The Canyons.

Synopsis: The Canyons is a contemporary thriller written by Bret Easton Ellis (Less Than Zero, American Psycho) and directed by Paul Schrader (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Affliction, Auto-Focus). The Canyons documents five twenty-something’s quest for power, love, sex and success in 2012 Hollywood.

The shoot will take place in LA with shooting dates starting July 9, 2012 - Jul 31, 2012.

Union/Rate SAG New Media and open to non SAG members as well.

Casting by:  Mary Vernieu, CSA, Venus Kanani, CSA, Michelle Wade Byrd

Seeking:
Christian (M) - 24 - 27
Tara (F) -  24 - 27
Ryan (M) - 24 - 27
Gina (F) - 24 - 27
Lindsay (F) - 30 - 31

For more information, click here

 

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John-Kraszinski-First-Film-RoleHere’s a cool video featuring a bunch of well-known actors in the very first on-camera roles.

Some of them are pretty obvious; Jack Nicholson in Little Shop of Horrors, Johnny Depp in A Nightmare on Elm Street, Nicholas Cage in Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Kevin Bacon in Animal House.

But, there are also some that I didn’t know like Woody Harrelson, John Krasinski, Jon Hamm and Jack Black.

Unfortunately, it’s back by music and you can’t hear any of the dialogue but it’s still fun to watch nonetheless.

Check it out below!

via Vulture

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william-h-macy-shamelessActor William H. Macy of Shameless fame has given Vulture sometime out of his busy schedule to discuss his hit Showtime series that everyone is talking about. 

Talking about what makes the series such a hit, Macy says that its the show’s truthful storylines.  We “ride that line of propriety, and sometimes we’ve fallen over it, we’re pretty good at landing on the correct side of it. We tell the truth about what’s going on. And the whole through line with Louise Fletcher [who played Frank’s mom, Peggy Gallagher] — wow. I was the luckiest guy to get to act that story. I just love that we get a little more insight into what made Frank Frank. And perhaps a little more sympathy for how sociopathic he is.”

While he does walk a fine line with his morally lacking alter ego Frank, Macy draws the line when it comes to violence, picking his roles carefully.  “We’ve [Macy and his wife Felicity Huffman] turned down parts in most of the really violent stuff. I can’t stand violence. I mean, I’m okay with violence as long as you tell the truth about it. It’s a big part of our lives, not just our culture. But I don’t like bullshit violence where there are seventeen bodies on the ground and nary a cop to be seen, or no price to be paid. I’m adamantly against censorship — this is more of a self-imposed thing. You don’t do the movie if the movie doesn’t tell the truth. Not to say that you can’t do fantasy; I mean the emotional truth. And sex is good. I believe even bad sex is good. It’s just that violence is bad. Even mild violence can be bad, if you’re just watching good wholesome kids be sent out to get killed.”

If fans are hoping that Macy will be writing an episode soon they will have to wait.  The 62 year-old actor, who wrote episode six of this past season, won’t be penning any more storylines anytime soon, focusing on his character instead.  “I was surprised at how tough it was. It’s too complicated for me to wear both hats, because I just show up and all this lovely stuff has been written for me; our team can regularly turn out ten, fifteen pages in a day without breaking a sweat. That would put the lowest budget indie film to shame.”

While he jokes about his foray into the world behind the camera, Macy also plans to direct at some point in his career.  “It’s my most fervent hope to direct a film, and I don’t know why I’m having such difficulty with it. I’ve gotten to the eleventh hour three times with Keep Coming Back, and each time the money fell out and broke my hear.  Directing television is a rarefied thing. The actors often know more about the script than the director. I would never say never, but it probably won’t be until season five, six, seven. For the time being, it would be rough, because I would need two or three weeks of prep, location scouting, two weeks of editing, and I would be acting at the same time, so it would be double duty. Life’s too short and I’m too old!”

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zac-effron-the-lucky-oneZac Efron will next be seen in Lee Daniel's thriller The Paperboy, alongside Nicole Kidman, John Cusack, Matthew McConaughey and Scott Glenn. He also recently worked alongside Dennis Quaid in Ramin Bahrani's latest film and appears in the comedy Liberal Arts, Josh Radnor's directorial debut, which premiered to rave reviews at the Sundance Film Festival.

Previously, Efron starred in Garry Marshall's ensemble romantic comedy New Year’s Eve and lent his voice to the animated feature Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax. He also starred in the title roles of the fantasy romance Charlie St. Cloud and the comedy 17 Again, both from director Burr Steers, and as the lovable Link Larkin in 2007’s smash hit musical Hairspray, directed by Adam Shankman. As part of the all-star cast he shared a Critics Choice Award for Best Acting Ensemble, the 2007 Hollywood Film Festival Award for Ensemble of the Year, and was honored with a Screen Actors Guild Award® nomination for Outstanding Motion Picture Cast. In addition, he won an MTV Movie Award for Breakthrough Performance.

Efron also starred in Richard Linklater's Me and Orson Welles, an adaptation of the novel by Robert Kaplow, which premiered to rave reviews at the 2008 Toronto Film Festival. More recently, he starred in Kenny Ortega's High School Musical 3: Senior Year, which set a box office record for the highest grossing opening weekend for a musical.

He first garnered attention in 2006 as the star of the original High School Musical, for which he won the Teen Choice Award for Breakout Star. Efron returned to the role of Troy Bolton in High School Musical 2, which broke cable TV records with 17.5 million viewers. His additional television credits include a role on the WB series Summerland and guest-starring roles on such shows as ER, The Guardian, CSI: Miami and NCIS.

Efron is also developing projects through his production company.

This biography/filmography of Zac Effron is courtesy of Warner Brothers and The Lucky One

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sam-worthington-wrath-of-the-titansSam Worthington, one of today’s busiest leading men, reprises the part he created in the 2010 hit Clash of the Titans. He more recently starred in the title role of the dramatic thriller Man on a Ledge. Worthington’s upcoming films include Simon West's Iraq War drama Thunder Run, with Gerard Butler, and the Australian film Drift.

Worthington was catapulted to global stardom with his performance in the 2009 mega blockbuster Avatar. Director James Cameron had hand-picked the actor to play the central role of Jake Scully in his groundbreaking science fiction adventure, which went on to earn more than $2.7 billion worldwide, making it the highest-grossing motion picture of all time.

A native of Australia, Worthington graduated from Sydney’s prestigious National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) in 1998. He began his career on the stage, appearing in a production of Judas Kiss, directed by Neil Armfield for Company B at the Belvoir Street Theatre.

In 2000, Worthington made an auspicious feature film debut with a starring role in the Australian film Bootmen. His performance brought him an Australian Film Institute (AFI) Award nomination for Best Actor. His subsequent Australian film credits include Dirty Deeds, with John Goodman, Toni Collette and Sam Neill, for which he earned a Film Critics Circle of Australia (FCCA) Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor, and Gettin’ Square, with David Wenham. He also appeared in the World War II drama Hart’s War, starring Bruce Willis.

However, it was his layered performance in Cate Shortland's critically acclaimed and commercially successful 2004 film Somersault that brought Worthington international attention. He won an AFI Award for Best Actor and earned his second FCCA Award nomination. In addition, the film made a clean sweep of the year’s AFI Awards, winning in all 13 film categories—a first in the awards’ history.

Worthington went on to star in the title role of Geoffrey Wright's 2006 contemporary adaptation of Shakespeare's Macbeth. He also starred with Christian Bale in McG’s action thriller Terminator Salvation. His additional film credits include John Dahl's The Great Raid, and the independent features The Debt, for director John Madden, and Last Night, opposite Keira Knightley.

On the small screen, Worthington recently created huge buzz with an action-packed commercial for the videogame Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, with Jonah Hill. His earlier Australian television credits include starring roles in two award-winning series: Love My Way, and The Surgeon. He also starred in the Delivery Man episode of Two Twisted, an anthology series produced by Bryan Brown.

This biography/filmography of Sam Worthington is courtesy of Warner Brothers and Wrath of the Titans

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